Maine

Will visited Maine on a couple of occasions and was very impressed with the state. His daughter, Mary, lived in Maine in 1934 and he commented on Maine’s politics many times, especially to references to “how Maine goes…”


“As Maine goes so goes New Hampshire” – Daily Telegrams, September 12, 1928


“As Maine goes, so goes the opposite way Mississippi. Whisper that to your friends.” – Daily Telegrams, September 13, 1928


“What do you know about Maine going sane? And “as Maine goes, so goes the postoffices.” Why, four years ago they imported a Democrat into the State just to show around at the fairs.” – Daily Telegrams, September 14, 1932


“Maine holds the first election every year. They hold it for the reason there is an old saying, as goes Maine, so goes the country. Well, they held it a couple of days ago and nobody has been interested enough in it to ask how it went. Nobody voted only the candidates that was running.” – Daily Telegrams, September 9, 1930


“I am in Maine for the first time. Now I have showed in every State, this year, including New Hampshire.

Maine is beautiful now and Portland is a great old town. Fine harbor that used, in the good old days, to harbor not only some great lumber fleets, but some Democrats. Short-sightedness has killed off both industries, Maine is and will be more so a very historic State, being the first State that ever broke a prohibition law. This town will be pointed out in years to come as the home of the original American bootlegger.” – Daily Telegrams, May 23, 1927


“Well out at daylight to fly to Maine to see my Mary. Here I had started out just to go to Texas, and wound up in Maine. Good thing there was no other states any further away. That Maine is a beautiful place. Lakewood where they have the theatre and summer stock company and a real one, is a great boon to the speaking stage. They all live in little cottages around the lake, put on a different show every week, and rehearse the one for the next week. Lord I wouldent know which one I was doing.” – Weekly Articles, 1934